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3 Things - Tuesday, Jan. 25

3Etiquette Best Practices

  1. Ask before you help   
    Just because someone has a disability, don’t assume she needs help. If the setting is accessible, people with disabilities can usually get around fine. Adults with disabilities want to be treated as independent people. Offer assistance only if the person appears to need it. A person with a disability will oftentimes communicate when she needs help. And if she does want help, ask how before you act.

  2. Be sensitive about physical contact
    Some people with disabilities depend on their arms for balance. Grabbing them, even if your intention is to assist, could knock them off balance. Avoid patting a person on the head or touching his wheelchair, scooter or cane. People with disabilities consider their equipment part of their personal space.

  3. Do not touch, address or feed a guide dog
    Whether the dog is in service or in training to serve, the rule of thumb is: don't touch or distract him. This is because interacting with a dog that is working or training could put the other half of his team — his owner — in harm's way.

Maggie Vaughan, CPACC
~ friend of DubBot, A11Y practitioner in higher ed